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HomeHollywood NewsBob Dylan Argues Co-Writer Gets No "Double-Dip" From $300 Million Songs Sale

Bob Dylan Argues Co-Writer Gets No “Double-Dip” From $300 Million Songs Sale

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The legendary musician wants to dismiss the lawsuit from the estate of late collaborator Jacques Levy, seeking $ 7.25 million from the $ 300 million catalog sale to Universal. In defense of a lawsuit, Bob Dylan’s lawyers first discussed some of the details about the veteran songwriter’s recent $ 300 million sales on his full list for Universal Lyricist.

This week, Bob Dylan moved to dismiss a lawsuit brought in New York from the estate of Jack Levy, who collaborated with Dylan on the 1976 album Desire. Levi’s widow claims the property deserves a share of the $ 300 million sales, specifically the target of $ 7.25 million, but according to Dylan, Levi wrote co-songs under a work-for-hire agreement that He was entitled to royalty and not any share. Copyright sales.

Bob Dylan’s legal team, led by Orin Snyder in Gibson Dunn, writes, “This lawsuit is an opportunistic attempt to recapture a 45-year-old contract with no contract allowed.” According to the memorandum in support of the dismissal, Dylan was one of the rare songwriters who owned the copyright in musical compositions.

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He clearly retained full publication control, and with regard to co-writing the song with others, sole proprietorship also came as he treated these musicians as employees in the contract. For the catalog’s sale last November, Dylan states that “they no longer own copyrights or have any right to royalties from their exploitation.”

But, Bob Dylan’s

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court papers state that unless he is getting new money from the exploitation of his legendary songs, including “All with Watchtower,” “Tangled Up in Blue” and “The Times They Are-Changin,” He ensured that Universal would accept the obligations of its older partners, including Levi, who wrote 10 songs and contracted to cut 35 percent of the income earned on them.

“Dylan protected his right to compensation from future use of the songs to ensure that the songs abolished his own rights,” the court stated, citing the characterization of the Levi estate, ” Impregnable double-dunk. “

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